Monday´s Comment
I’d give advice if I knew what, or Businessman’s life is hard
30. 6. 2014

One month ago I attended a seminar on corporate responsibility, devoted to no-corrupt behaviour. It was a difficult topic for me, as I don’t own a firm and, I am therefore in the “this-advice-I-give-you-free” position.

One month ago I attended a seminar on corporate responsibility, devoted to no-corrupt behaviour. It was a difficult topic for me, as I don’t own a firm and, I am therefore in the “this-advice-I-give-you-free” position.

Anyway, let’s try and have a few varying looks at one and the same problem.

Section 2 of the now-defunct old Commercial Code defined the goal of enterprise, which is to create profit. Many economic theories assert that much. However, other legal standards stipulate that an individual and a firm alike must not act illegally, under pain, or else expose themselves to a range of sanctions. There are areas of enterprise in the Czech Republic, especially those with affinity to public finance, where one des not succeed unless his company pays bribes. But on the other hand, I also know several firms which, rather than bribing someone, have transferred their business out of the Czech Republic. This is one of the possible solutions. Another option is to contact the bodies participating in criminal proceedings and prove the “extortionist” guilty. Sadly, there aren’t so many examples of this available in this country. Being perfectly aware of the risks and potential impacts on the firm, I am still convinced that this is one of the ways to challenge evil.

We know from our experience that bribery is most often committed by the owner or top management of the firm. Such behaviour must logically project into the overall culture of the company. Ask anyone on the payroll of, say, transnational company IBM, how it works there... Well, it might be office gossip, but the initiated know how exactly it goes.

We also know from our experience that when the owner or top management of a firm unambiguously declares that bribery is completely unacceptable, it will have an infinitely greater impact on the employees than a thousand formal policies. We’ve read various ethical codes and the lofty phrases in them! I happen to know several company owners for whom bribery is totally unacceptable, and because they are know for that, they don’t get visited by any extortionists.

I know it’s quite a difficult topic, and I also know how hard the decision can be for the owner of a firm that has responsibility for its business and employees. There need not be any good solutions, there can be only the choice between a bigger or lesser evil: I shall not bribe or I shall not be extorted—but I will have to sack 20 staff, or alternately I’ll pay and those 20 people will have bread. Honestly, I don’t know how I would decide.

Finally, points to ponder:

ČEZ, the company which repeatedly takes the first places on the ladders of the most wanted employer, although its reputation, or that of some of its former and current representatives has reached a critically low ebb: See “I want to work for a respectful company” vs. “Good income and self-fulfilment”. This is an episode from the recent past but, alas, also from the roaring present.

One month ago I attended a seminar on corporate responsibility, devoted to no-corrupt behaviour. It was a difficult topic for me, as I don’t own a firm and, I am therefore in the “this-advice-I-give-you-free” position.

Anyway, let’s try and have a few varying looks at one and the same problem.

One month ago I attended a seminar on corporate responsibility, devoted to no-corrupt behaviour. It was a difficult topic for me, as I don’t own a firm and, I am therefore in the “this-advice-I-give-you-free” position.

Anyway, let’s try and have a few varying looks at one and the same problem.

Section 2 of the now-defunct old Commercial Code defined the goal of enterprise, which is to create profit. Many economic theories assert that much. However, other legal standards stipulate that an individual and a firm alike must not act illegally, under pain, or else expose themselves to a range of sanctions. There are areas of enterprise in the Czech Republic, especially those with affinity to public finance, where one des not succeed unless his company pays bribes. But on the other hand, I also know several firms which, rather than bribing someone, have transferred their business out of the Czech Republic. This is one of the possible solutions. Another option is to contact the bodies participating in criminal proceedings and prove the “extortionist” guilty. Sadly, there aren’t so many examples of this available in this country. Being perfectly aware of the risks and potential impacts on the firm, I am still convinced that this is one of the ways to challenge evil.

We know from our experience that bribery is most often committed by the owner or top management of the firm. Such behaviour must logically project into the overall culture of the company. Ask anyone on the payroll of, say, transnational company IBM, how it works there... Well, it might be office gossip, but the initiated know how exactly it goes.

We also know from our experience that when the owner or top management of a firm unambiguously declares that bribery is completely unacceptable, it will have an infinitely greater impact on the employees than a thousand formal policies. We’ve read various ethical codes and the lofty phrases in them! I happen to know several company owners for whom bribery is totally unacceptable, and because they are know for that, they don’t get visited by any extortionists.

I know it’s quite a difficult topic, and I also know how hard the decision can be for the owner of a firm that has responsibility for its business and employees. There need not be any good solutions, there can be only the choice between a bigger or lesser evil: I shall not bribe or I shall not be extorted—but I will have to sack 20 staff, or alternately I’ll pay and those 20 people will have bread. Honestly, I don’t know how I would decide.

Finally, points to ponder:

ČEZ, the company which repeatedly takes the first places on the ladders of the most wanted employer, although its reputation, or that of some of its former and current representatives has reached a critically low ebb: See “I want to work for a respectful company” vs. “Good income and self-fulfilment”. This is an episode from the recent past but, alas, also from the roaring present.

One month ago I attended a seminar on corporate responsibility, devoted to no-corrupt behaviour. It was a difficult topic for me, as I don’t own a firm and, I am therefore in the “this-advice-I-give-you-free” position.

Anyway, let’s try and have a few varying looks at one and the same problem.
Section 2 of the now-defunct old Commercial Code defined the goal of enterprise, which is to create profit. Many economic theories assert that much. However, other legal standards stipulate that an individual and a firm alike must not act illegally, under pain, or else expose themselves to a range of sanctions. There are areas of enterprise in the Czech Republic, especially those with affinity to public finance, where one des not succeed unless his company pays bribes. But on the other hand, I also know several firms which, rather than bribing someone, have transferred their business out of the Czech Republic. This is one of the possible solutions. Another option is to contact the bodies participating in criminal proceedings and prove the “extortionist” guilty. Sadly, there aren’t so many examples of this available in this country. Being perfectly aware of the risks and potential impacts on the firm, I am still convinced that this is one of the ways to challenge evil.
We know from our experience that bribery is most often committed by the owner or top management of the firm. Such behaviour must logically project into the overall culture of the company. Ask anyone on the payroll of, say, transnational company IBM, how it works there... Well, it might be office gossip, but the initiated know how exactly it goes.
We also know from our experience that when the owner or top management of a firm unambiguously declares that bribery is completely unacceptable, it will have an infinitely greater impact on the employees than a thousand formal policies. We’ve read various ethical codes and the lofty phrases in them! I happen to know several company owners for whom bribery is totally unacceptable, and because they are know for that, they don’t get visited by any extortionists.

I know it’s quite a difficult topic, and I also know how hard the decision can be for the owner of a firm that has responsibility for its business and employees. There need not be any good solutions, there can be only the choice between a bigger or lesser evil: I shall not bribe or I shall not be extorted—but I will have to sack 20 staff, or alternately I’ll pay and those 20 people will have bread. Honestly, I don’t know how I would decide.

Finally, points to ponder:
ČEZ, the company which repeatedly takes the first places on the ladders of the most wanted employer, although its reputation, or that of some of its former and current representatives has reached a critically low ebb: See “I want to work for a respectful company” vs. “Good income and self-fulfilment”. This is an episode from the recent past but, alas, also from the roaring present.

 

I know it’s quite a difficult topic, and I also know how hard the decision can be for the owner of a firm that has responsibility for its business and employees. There need not be any good solutions, there can be only the choice between a bigger or lesser evil: I shall not bribe or I shall not be extorted—but I will have to sack 20 staff, or alternately I’ll pay and those 20 people will have bread. Honestly, I don’t know how I would decide.

Finally, points to ponder:

ČEZ, the company which repeatedly takes the first places on the ladders of the most wanted employer, although its reputation, or that of some of its former and current representatives has reached a critically low ebb: See “I want to work for a respectful company” vs. “Good income and self-fulfilment”. This is an episode from the recent past but, alas, also from the roaring present.

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